Best dating books of all time

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Some may call it a reductio ad absurdum but ultimately it highlights the dangers of the worship of technology, the establishment of systems and rules and progress - while it is full of allusions to the early Soviet state, it has a universal message which is certainly interesting - furthermore, its relatively inconclusive ending evades traditional dystopian SF tropes of the revolution or regime change per se.

A very accessible book by which to begin reading Banks, an author whose core franchise/setting appears impenetrable.

This book features on every 'Best of' list at some time or other and there's a good reason: it is a hilariously perfect and lovingly absurd journey of a simple human being through the wild riot that is existence.

While some might consider this novel a pulp horror twist on Lord of the Flies, it is given a new dimension if read with knowledge of Japanese contemporary history and perceptions of young people.

I always keep an extra copy in the house, because when it gets borrowed, it tends never to come back (but that's OK).

Hard to adequately describe the majesty of this book. I'd use the phrases 'mind blowing' or 'mind expanding' if they weren't such cliches. It gives a glimpse into one of our many possible futures and problems we may face in the future.

For any layperson who wants to understand why we behave the way we do, Sapolsky has created an immensely readable, often hilarious, romp through the worlds of psychology, primatology, sociology and neurobiology.

Not only does the book imagine an alien race, but an alien race without genders.

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